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DuBois and Carbone lead Raiders softball to a 10-1 win over Naugatuck at ESPN Wide World of Sports.

POSTED April 12, 2017
BY Timothy W. Gaffney
Twitter: @TimothyGaffney


WALT DISNEY WORLD, FLORIDA: As the barrel of the aluminum bat made its way over the third basemen’s head, nearly everyone, including the batter, Torrington’s Carissa Carbone froze after being part of something you just don’t see without the benefit of a different kind bat.

Normally we only see broken or sawed off bats when a hardball is in use, but on Tuesday morning in the land of the unbelievable, it happened nonetheless in a 10-1 Raiders win over rival Naugatuck at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex.

Carbone’s hit, part of a five for five day at the plate, came in a three-run fourth inning that allowed the Raiders to begin to pull away from the Greyhounds and for the senior third basemen, led to an even better at bat her next time up when she borrowed a teammates bat and launched a two-run home run over the left center field fence.

The bat Carbone borrowed belonged to starting pitcher Ali DuBois who threw a complete game, two-hit, three walk, 11 strikeout day as Torrington evened their season record at 1-1.

Still hard to believe that the Raiders have played but two games on April 11 but the weather up north (of course it was 80 something in Torrington on Tuesday) being what it was, the start of the season was significantly delayed.

After a quick practice on Monday night, the Raiders got back into action against a Greyhound team that was down earlier than Torrington and wrapped up their games after the loss to the Raiders.

The Greyhounds had lost to Windsor by a final of 14-2 on Monday and came in looking to solve a pitcher they have yet to beat in three years and early on, looked sharp.

After Torrington got onto the board first on a RBI single by Lauren Jamieson that plated Carbone, the Greyhounds came back and tied things at a run each on a single to left by catcher Alexandra Longhams.

DuBois gave up two hits and that run in the opening inning as she worked to get acclimated to the conditions of a few different items.

“I had to get used to the mound,” DuBois said. “The ground was really hard it took a while to get used to where to pitch from. That and the softballs, which had barely any seams to grip.”

Once she did though, DuBois was back to her old self, running through the Naugatuck lineup, retiring 13 of 15 at one point, striking out six straight over the third and fourth innings.

Sophomore Megan Schofield started for the home team and deserved a better fate than her defense gave her after beginning the game strong, holding Torrington to just that one run over the first three innings.

In the fourth though, the wheels started to come off as the Hounds committed a pair of errors and were on the wrong end of that broken bat that knocked in a run.

The Torrington three-run third was followed by a four-run fourth, highlighted by the Carbone bomb and with the way DuBois was dealing, it was all but over.

DuBois would walk three as she continues to battle a stiff back that has been bothering her early in the spring.

The Raiders head coach, Maryanne Musselman was pleased with how her team finished, if not with how they started.

“We are a very slow staring ream for some reason,” Musselman said. “I don’t know why, I can jump up and down and yell but we just always seem to start slow. Once we got going though, I liked what I saw.”

Carbone had herself a day at the plate with three runs scored and three driven in to go along with being perfect in five trips to the plate.

Leadoff batter Alexis Tyrrell scored a pair of runs and had two hits while first basemen Amanda Thiel was two for four with a run scored and an RBI.

DuBois, who loves to hit, ended her day at the plate with a pair of hits and a sacrifice fly in the Raiders sixth.

A pair of un-official games are on deck for Torrington on Wednesday as they face Rockville at noon, followed by another un-official contest versus Coventry at 2.

 

      

  

   

 

 

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