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Jordan Williams on just about everything

POSTED July 22, 2011
BY Patrick Tiscia
Twitter: @PatrickTiscia


For Torrington’s Jordan Williams, the past month has been unlike any other.

From the stress of wondering what city and team he would end up with in the NBA, to the post-draft press conference and workouts with the New Jersey Nets, and finally, to the NBA lockout, Williams has had a crash course on professional sports and the business that comes with it.

Recently, Williams, along with his father Leron and brother Desmond, joined the Litchfield County Sports Show to discuss his days at Torrington High School and his excitement of getting selected by the Nets.

Here’s what he had to say…

On draft night:

“I thought at least I would go at No. 37 to the Clippers, but I was hoping to go at 36 (to the Nets). I couldn’t be happier to be a Net. It’s pretty rare for a rookie to have a chance to fight for a spot for playing time and I’m looking forward to that chance. We have a young team with a young coach (Avery Johnson) and the future is bright.”

On pre-draft workouts:

“The travel was tough, being in a different city every day. I’d arrive in one city at 2 a.m. then have to workout at 7 a.m. This was a good experience for me and I got a good feel of what the travel (in the NBA) will be like.”

On post-draft workouts:

“MarShon (Brooks, New Jersey’s first round pick) and I flew to Santa Barbara, CA right after the draft to workout and play a little basketball. We crammed in some offensive and defensive sets and tried to get familiar with the name of the plays. We met with the coaches and had a lot of fun. It was a great experience.”

On bonding with Brooks:

“We spent three days together and we clicked as friends really quick. He’s almost like a brother to me already. I’m very excited to play basketball with him.”

On Nets head coach Avery Johnson:

“He’s a great guy who knows so much about the game. He has a lot of wisdom to spread. He told me to stay hungry and humbled and that’s what I’ve tried to do.”

On the journey to the NBA:

“There are some people surprised that I’m in the NBA. It’s been one of my dreams since I was 10. For me and my family, this was the plan.”

On realizing he is actually in the NBA:

“I still don’t realize it some times. I probably won’t until I put on the jersey for the first time.”

On his favorite NBA player growing up:

“I was a huge Vince Carter fan. I loved watching him dunk from his days with the Raptors. It’s going to be an honor playing on the same floor with players like him, but I won’t be star struck. That’s not the type of person I am.”

On wearing the same No. 15 Carter wore with the Nets:

“Fifteen was a number I wore before high school. It’s pretty cool to get to wear the same number (Carter) wore with the Nets.”

On plans during the NBA lockout:

“Right now, I’m going to stay here (in Torrington). It’s important to me to work out where I feel most comfortable. I have the keys to the high school gym and I’m also excited to spend time with my family.”

On winning a state championship as a freshman at Torrington High School:

“My picture was in the paper a few times during that run and that was exciting. I scored 10 points in the championship game (against Holy Cross) and that game really helped build my confidence as a player. It was a great time for the whole team.”

On breaking the backboard at Naugatuck High School his senior year:

“It felt good. The crowd was chanting “What’s a Terp!” the whole game (Williams had just committed to Maryland) and I already had 47 points. I really couldn’t do much more. When I broke the backboard, I just turned and looked at them."

Desmond Williams: “I was behind the play, someone had just missed a layup and Jordan followed the shot and glass went every where. It was a surreal moment.”

The dunk became a Youtube hit and has over 80,000 views. Here’s the link to it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lh_oIvJyGNY

On long-term goals:

“My goal is to play 10-15 years. To be in a gym and playing basketball for a living, I couldn’t ask for more."

For more from Patrick Tiscia click here